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November 6, 2023

40 Incredible Photos of Prague After the Liberation in 1945

The Prague offensive was the last major military operation of World War II in Europe. The offensive was fought on the Eastern Front from 6 May to 11 May 1945. Fought concurrently with the Prague uprising, the offensive significantly helped the liberation of Czechoslovakia in 1945. The offensive was one of the last engagements of World War II in Europe and continued after Nazi Germany’s unconditional capitulation on 8/9 May.

The city of Prague was ultimately liberated by the USSR during the Prague offensive. All of the German troops of Army Group Centre (Heeresgruppe Mitte) and many of Army Group Ostmark (formerly known as Army Group South) were killed or captured, or fell into the hands of the Allies after the capitulation.

These photos were collected by Wayne Huebner that show street scenes of Prague after the liberation around 1945.

Prague. Charles Bridge and Hradčany, 1945

Prague. Charles Bridge, 1945

Prague. Charles Bridge, 1945

Prague. Charles Bridge, 1945

Prague. Charles Bridge, 1945

After the liberation of Prague, 1945

After the liberation of Prague, 1945

After the liberation of Prague, 1945

After the liberation of Prague, 1945

After the liberation of Prague, 1945

After the liberation of Prague. They arrived on time, but tired, 1945

Prague street, 1945

Prague street, 1945

Prague street, 1945

Prague. A destroyed German tank on the Old Town Square, 1945

Prague. Aerial damage on Václavské náměstí, 1945

Prague. Building on the Kampa, 1945

Prague. Burial of fallen Russian soldiers at the church of St. Ludmila, 1945

Prague. Burning Hitler on Václavské náměstí, 1945

Prague. Czechoslovak army on Václavské náměstí, 1945

Prague. Hradcany-St. Vitus cathedral, 1945

Prague. Hradčany, 1945

Prague. Hradčany, Alchemists' Street/Golden Alley, 1945

Prague. Jan Hus monument during the government's speech on Old Town Square, 1945

Prague. Liberation of Václavské náměstí, 1945

Prague. Old castle steps, 1945

Prague. Old Town Hall after the fight, 1945

Prague. One of the first Russian tanks on Václavské náměstí, 1945

Prague. President Edvard Beneš on Staroměstské náměstí, 1945

Prague. Russian tank at the National Theater, 1945

Prague. Russian tanks on Mánes Bridge, 1945

Prague. Staroměstská radnice, 1945

Prague. Staroměstský orloj, 1945

Prague. Statue of Charles IV, 1945

Prague. The Kampa, 1945

Prague. The ruined astronomical clock at the Old Town Hall, 1945

Prague. Two from a tank, 1945

Prague. Welcoming President Edvard Beneš, 1945

Prague. Wenceslas Square after the fighting, 1945

Symbolic grave of the Czech warriors who fell liberating Prague, 1945

1 comment:

  1. As a resident of Prague this is an often overlooked moment in Czech history. In 1945 the downfall of the Nazis was fairly inevitable, and the fighting was pretty limited to a few places in the city as the Russian forces entered the city. The revolt was soon overshadowed in 1948 with the communist coup, which turned the country into a satellite of Russia, which would remain until the late 80s. Luckily the city escaped the widespread destruction that many European cities experienced at that time, but at the cost, many believe, of Czech dignity. BeneŇ° chose not to fight the invasion or the annexation of the Sudetenland at the beginning of the war, despite being very well prepared to defend itself. Aside from the assassination of Heidrich in Prague, the resistance never really gained much momentum, and the Czechs never managed to throw out the Germans until the result was more or less assured by the Russians.

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