January 17, 2019

Fascinating Photos That Capture Everyday Life of Cuba in the 1970s

These fascinating photos were taken by Manel Armengol that show everyday life of Cuba in 1976.

Cuba, Matanzas, 1976. An old colonial street of Santa Clara. A sign marks the headquarters of the Workers' Social Circle

Cuba, Matanzas, 1976. Colorful masks announcing the Carnival in a square in Matanzas

Cuba, Matanzas, 1976. Political slogan 'To decide and govern with the people's power' on top of a colonial building

Cuba, Matanzas, 1976. Pool and garden of a national tourism resort in Cuba

Cuba, Matanzas, 1976. Two buses at avenue with colonial buildings





Mugshots of Civil Rights Activist Freedom Riders in Jackson, Mississippi During the Summer of 1961

Extraordinary courage stepped up to bigotry in America during the summer of 1961. The acts of bravery came not from soldiers in battle or politicians taking a stand. No, in this case, the valor came from everyday Americans – civilians concerned about the state of their country. Eventually, there would be hundreds of them, acting over a five month period. They came from all over the U.S. They were black and white; liberal and conservative; Catholic, Protestant, and Jew. Many were college students; some from the seminary. They came to lend their presence and put their bodies on the line. Their actions were innocent and non-violent. All they set out to do was ride on a bus – or rather, insure that a person of any color could ride on a bus from one state to another. They were called “Freedom Riders.”

Before it was all over more than 60 “Freedom Rides” would criss-cross the South between May and November of 1961. At least 436 individuals would ride buses and trains to make their point. However, a number of the “freedom riders” were physically assaulted, chased, and/or threatened by white mobs, some beaten with pipes, chains and baseball bats. Many of the riders were also arrested and jailed, especially in Mississippi. Yet these arrests became part of the protest – and in this case, a badge of honor.

For those arrested were not criminals. Far from it. They were among America’s finest heroes. Yes, America has a long line of heroes, and none more honorable than those who fought and died in military conflicts – from the Revolutionary War through WWII, Korea, Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan. Those heroes occupy a special and honored place. Yet few heroes stand taller on the domestic front than those who came from the civilian population during the 1961 civil rights “freedom rides.”

Below are some of the mugshots of the “Freedom Rides” after being arrested for protesting in Jackson, Mississippi in 1961. Most of them were sent to the brutal Parchman Prison in Mississippi.










30 Brilliant Vintage Postcards That Show Everyday Life of West Berlin From Between the 1950s and 1970s

West Berlin was the name of the western part of Berlin between 1949 and 1990. It was the American, British, and French occupied sectors that were created in 1945.

In many ways it was integrated (joined) with West Germany, but it was not a part of West Germany or East Germany. The Soviet sector became East Berlin, which East Germany claimed as its capital. The Western Allies never recognized this claim. They said that the whole city was still under four-power occupation. The building of the Berlin Wall in 1961 surrounded West Berlin.

These vintage postcards are of West Berlin from between the 1950s and ’70s.










Incredible Colorized Photos of Ireland's Civil War (1923-24)

The Irish Civil War was a conflict that followed the Irish War of Independence and accompanied the establishment of the Irish Free State, an entity independent from the United Kingdom but within the British Empire.

The civil war was waged between two opposing groups, Irish republicans and Irish nationalists, over the Anglo-Irish Treaty. The forces of the Provisional Government (which became the Free State in December 1922) supported the Treaty, while the Republican opposition saw it as a betrayal of the Irish Republic (which had been proclaimed during the Easter Rising). Many of those who fought on both sides in the conflict had been members of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) during the War of Independence.

The Civil War was won by the Free State forces, who benefitted from substantial quantities of weapons provided by the British Government. The conflict may have claimed more lives than the War of Independence that preceded it, and left Irish society divided and embittered for generations.

These war-time photographs were colourized by photographer and colourist John O'Byrne from Rathangan, Kildare, Ireland that show the Irish conflict which led to thousands of deaths and prisoners of war.

Irish Free State Army soldier in firing position inside a badly damaged house. His rifle is pointed through a hole in the wall of a room and debris is lying on the ground and a door has been kicked off its hinges. The treaty also stipulated that members of the new Irish parliament would have to take the following Oath of Allegiance: "I... do solemnly swear true faith and allegiance to the Constitution of the Irish Free State as by law established, and that I will be faithful to His Majesty King George V, his heirs and successors by law in virtue of the common citizenship of Ireland with Great Britain and her adherence to and membership of the group of nations forming the British Commonwealth of nations"

Free State Soldiers take a break from fighting on the street in Dublin possibly during the fighting of the four courts where wounded men are being tended to while others catch their breath. The Irish Civil War was a conflict that followed the Irish War of Independence and came alongside the establishment of the Irish Free State, an entity independent from the United Kingdom but within the British Empire. The civil war was waged between two opposing groups, Irish republicans and Irish nationalists, over the Anglo-Irish Treaty

Irish Free State Army officers and men outside the Royal Hotel in Limerick. Some are smoking and one is sporting an injured arm. The group includes two clergymen and some civilians. The hotel was fortified with a barricade, wire and sandbags. The forces of the Provisional Government - which became the Free State in December 1922 - supported the Treaty, while the Republican opposition saw it as a betrayal of the Irish Republic, which had been proclaimed during the Easter Rising. Many of those who fought on both sides in the conflict had been members of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) during the War of Independence

A man in civilian clothes reaching up with cigarettes to Irish Free State Army soldiers in a spirit merchant's truck as locals stand by watching

An unmounted officer stands with a drawn sword held at shoulder height in a sword drill under the supervision of Captain Flanagan and Captain Nolan at McKee Barracks Dublin





January 16, 2019

40 Stunning Photos of 1950s Beauties Wearing Unique Hats Designed by Emme and Adolfo

Ethel Price started in the millinery business in the mid 1920s, training for five years at Bruck-Weiss, a New York millinery firm. Sometime in the 1930s, Emme went into business with two women partners whose first names were Mildred and Evie – they put their initials together and came up with the company’s name “Emme Hats”. Founded as a custom order salon, the company hired 22 year old Cuban-born Adolfo Sardinas as their leading designer in 1952.

1950s beauties wearing hats designed by Emme and Adolfo

By 1961, Emme hats had grown to include a line of wholesale hats for department stores as well as a budget line ‘Emme Boutique’ alongside their high-end custom orders. Adolfo and Ethel parted ways in early 1962 over design credit on the Emme label. Adolfo opened his own millinery the next year and within a few years had transformed his business into dressmaking, become a well known New York designer of Chanel style tweed suits and glamorous evening gowns. Before retiring in 1993, one of Adolfo’s most loyal customers had been Nancy Reagan.

After Adolfo left Emme in 1962 Ethel Price hired Anello, an Italian milliner, as head designer. Emme remained a popular millinery but hat sales were plummeting in the 1960s. In 1970, Ethel Price retired from the business and closed Emme hats. Ethel Price died in 1987 at the age of 85.

These stunning photos from Sophia that show classic beauties wearing unique hats designed by Emme and Adolfo in the 1950s.

Cherry Nelms and Jean Patchett in wrinkle-resistant Celanese acetate suits by Handmacher's Weathervanes, hats by Emme, photo by Richard Rutledge, Vogue, April 15, 1954

Dovima in cotton-silk dress by Adele Simpson, hat by Emme, pearl jewelry by David Webb, photo by John Rawlings, Vogue, April 1, 1954

Jean Patchett in flowered silk shirt of African daisies embroidered on dotted white silk, orange silk shantung skirt, matching banded hat by Emme, photo by Irving Penn, Vogue, June 1954

Anne St. Marie in coral suit with wrapped jacket and released skirt by Swansdown, planter's hat by Emme, photo by Richard Avedon, Harper's Bazaar, February 1955

Evelyn Tripp in stitched collar suit of lightweight Palm Beach cloth by Sacony, turban hat by Emme, 1955





22 Funny Vintage Russian Beer Advertisements From the Late 19th and Early 20th Century

People in the Soviet Union loved beer, almost as much as vodka. They would drink it in the morning, while fishing, at the banya, and after a hard day’s work. It was always beer o’clock.


Before the revolution, the Russian Empire produced different varieties of beers brewed according to Western standards: Venskoe (Viennese), Munchenskoe (Munich), Pilsener, Bavarskoe (Bavarian), Kulmbakskoe (Kulmbach), Bogemskoe (Bohemian) and others. After 1917, the “bourgeois” names were replaced by Soviet titles. For example, Venskoe became Zhigulevskoe (Zhiguli), Pilsener – Russkoe, and Munchenskoe – Ukrainskoe.

These vintage Russian beer advertisements come from 1880-1915:











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