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January 18, 2023

Conversational Pits of the 1960s and 1970s

Conversation pits were typically accessed by a small staircase and filled with modular seating that could be arranged in multiple ways, such as in an L- or U-shape. They were popular throughout the 1960s and 1970s when, as interior designer Leonard Horowitz puts it in the Bangor Daily News, “People were rejecting things, which is why they went to forms.” He explains that the conversation pit represented the social changes taking place during that time, when people were more interested in a room’s function as opposed to its furnishings.

Architect Bruce Goff is often credited with designing the very first conversation pit in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in 1927. However, The Miller House – built in 1952 by architect Eero Saarinen and designer Alexander Girard in Columbus, Indiana – is said to be the home that incited the conversation pit’s popularity. This is according to Antonio Rom├ín’s Eero Saarinen: An Architecture of Multiplicity which stated that Saarinen was inspired by the open, yet controlled, spaces he saw in Japanese homes.
























6 comments:

  1. BOSS. I remember those. When your leftist overlords ban fireplaces, think how cozy those conversation pits will be.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wood burning fireplaces in California have been banned for decades.

      Delete
    2. "Banned for decades". Prove it! I hate government intervention in that type of stuff, but it just isn't true.

      Delete
  2. Get Smart: Max's apartment had one of these I think

    ReplyDelete
  3. I'm in the industry and these never caught on, thank god.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Basically a hot tub without the water.

    ReplyDelete


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