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July 7, 2021

20 Funny Photographs of Ringo Starr in the 1960s

“Playing without Ringo is like driving a car on three wheels.” – George Harrison , The Beatles

“We loved him. And we just thought he was the very best drummer we’d ever seen. And we wanted him in the group. We were big fans of his.” – Paul McCartney, The Beatles

Depending on how you look at it, Ringo Starr was both the oldest and the youngest of the Beatles. He was the last one to join the group, as he was replacing their original drummer Pete Best. But, he was also born before John, Paul, and George.

Richard Starkey was born July 7, 1940, in the Liverpool district of Dingle. He was the only child of Richard Starkey Sr. and Elsie Gleave, who both worked as confectioners. Starr’s love for music emerged at the age of 13, while he was staying in the hospital recovering from tuberculosis. During his extended stay, Starr joined fellow patients to form a hospital band. Starr’s first “drum” was a cotton bobbin that he used as a mallet to hit the cabinets in his hospital room.

You might be wondering just what inspired Starr’s famous stage name. He first developed that name in the late 1950s while he was a struggling musician. At the time, he wasn’t part of the Beatles, but instead, he played drums for a band called the Raging Texans. Starr chose his new surname because he felt it made people think of American country music. His first name, Ringo, was inspired by all the rings that he wore on his fingers. Those fingers (and “the RING!”) would later play a starring role in the movie Help!

Speaking of the Raging Texans, they ended up changing their name to the Hurricanes by the time Starr was recruited. They became highly successful for a Liverpool band, touring abroad in France and Germany. It was during this 1960 German tour, in the city of Hamburg, where Ringo Starr first met a scrappy young band comprised of John Lennon, Paul McCartney, and George Harrison.

The rest is history!
























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