Bring back some good or bad memories

April 17, 2015

23 Rare and Stunning Color Portrait Photos of French Women from the 1920s

French photographer Gustave Gain (1876-1945) was born in Cherbourg, France on June 27, 1876. As a chemist he keens on photography and related technical achievements. After the invention of the Autochrome by the Lumière brothers, Gustave is actively engaged in color photograph.

Gustave Gain loves beach. In the summer, he spent much time with his family on the coast of the English Channel in Brittany and Normandy, where he took a lot of stunning shots of his wife, Adeline and other women.

























21 comments:

  1. I wanted to see some nips!

    ReplyDelete
  2. You poor thing.... don't you know what art is?

    ReplyDelete
  3. Ugly women is art?


    with John, where are the "fashion" nips

    ReplyDelete
  4. These are beautiful! I really love to see all the details and everything via colour techniques. It seems vivid as it was a present days. I would love to see more. Thank you for sharing !

    ReplyDelete
  5. Paulette IvanchanApril 18, 2015 at 2:16 AM

    I Loved the pictures in the mall,booth.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Paulette IvanchanApril 18, 2015 at 2:17 AM

    Blast from the past from,some,of our favorite,Actors,actresses, singers,and artists.,

    ReplyDelete
  7. Photography is art, buffoon.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Thanks for this! I find this subject very interesting too and it's frustrating when articles like this pop up with so many pictures that are obviously not post-mortem.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Indeed, it's a fascinating subject, sad as it is ... a glimpse into the past and how they didn't have the same view or fear of death we have now.
    But absolutely it's frustrating when the subjects are clearly living at the time.


    Most people say "big deal, who cares?" ... I know that years and years later from now, I would not want someone looking at a photo of myself or my loved ones and claiming any of us to be post mortem. These people are long gone, indeed, but it's just a matter of respect. Glad we agree. :)

    ReplyDelete
  10. #21 both are deceased. They both have stands behind them

    ReplyDelete
  11. You are incorrect on some of these. #21 is obvious that they both have stands. You can clearly see them behind their feet. #9 and #10 both have stands as well.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Interesting! Thanks for taking the time to explain. I've never been especially interested in this type of photography but I must admit, stumbling upon these images was intriguing!

    ReplyDelete
  13. I expect their view of death was influenced by familiarity.

    ReplyDelete
  14. While I'm human and make mistakes like the rest of us, I can assure you I am not incorrect about 21, 9 or 10. You have entirely missed the point of everything I stated.


    I never said stands were not used. What I said are stands were used for the LIVING. Not the DEAD. That is the hoax that people keep falling for and what you are believing, is not even physically possible.


    The children in 9, 10 AND 21 were fully alive at the time that photo was taken. They are LOOKING into the CAMERA. Something a dead person cannot do. Stands or not stands makes no difference. Stands were used for children (and others) to keep them still.


    I'm starting to repeat myself now so perhaps instead ... I'd suggest you read the following articles, maybe they will explain it better than I.

    http://cabinetofcuriosities.ca/pictures-of-the-dead-the-truth-about-post-mortem-photography/

    http://mourningportraits.blogspot.com/p/hoaxes-scams-ebay-optimism.html

    https://www.facebook.com/notes/the-thanatos-archive/ebay-scam-alert-the-standing-post-mortem/10150122306179491



    And if you ever meet a mortician, or a forensic pathologist or anyone who works with the deceased ... simply ask them if they can make a dead person not only stand up with the use of a simple prop ... AND have them "pose", naturally, their arms, their legs, even their hands ... like a bendable barbie doll, and then also have them look straight into the camera as if alive. It ISN'T possible.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Yeah, it is really intriguing. I find myself wondering about their personal lives and situations. Thankfully many in these photos were not dead yet so we can only hope and pray they had long, full lives. The ones who are deceased in the photos, are so sad ... and feels somewhat invasive, as they allowed a glimpse into what looks like another world entirely, from ours.

    ReplyDelete
  16. thankyou for explaining this. i am at the momment putting together a display about funeral and death customs of the Victorian era for a celebration of 160 years of our local cemetery. part of this display will be about post mortem photography, and thanks to your insights will be a much better informed piece than it would have been before. i was trying to put together a collection of ten genuine images, but now i will use and explain some common hoax's, which i had fallen for in the past. including the use of stands and the hidden mother. having worked in a mortuary i was always aware about the lack of pose-ability, but you have really opened my eyes, and i am very grateful.

    ReplyDelete
  17. You're very welcome and I'm so glad it helped. What a fascinating project you are taking on. Very glad I could help clear up the misconceptions. Best of luck on your Victorian display! :)

    ReplyDelete
  18. No, they're not.. stands were used to alive people as well..

    ReplyDelete
  19. I remember my Grandma talking about using the stands when a photographer would make their rounds in small towns and rural areas once or twice a year and people, usually families would partake in his services. Having your picture taken could take anywhere from 3-10 minutes and for people not used to having their picture taken in the first place, and standing still could prove to be a challenge for babies, small children and some adults. The propping stands may have made the difference between a pretty good not-blurry picture or a 'who the heck is that?' blurry head and sort of in focus body.
    The whole process of victorian photographs is super interesting, but this article - and many others - say it was 'commonplace' in victorian times, but it really wasn't. Of my family members who lived pre 1920's, the pictures we have are wonderful, a great, great, great aunt smoking her corncob pipe while sitting on an upturned log, in front of her sod house with 1 window, is very touching. She was also not wearing a dress, but overalls - Grandma did not have any explanation for that!!

    ReplyDelete
  20. I agree ... which just goes to show what stands were used for. And I think they were mostly used for those times when a photograph would take forever to shoot, and yes, to keep the subject in focus.


    I also agree, SO many wonderful old "sitting" photos ... grandfolks in a rocking chair, kids with their pets. LOVE that stuff. Your grandma sounded wonderfully earthy!

    ReplyDelete

FOLLOW US
FacebookInstagramTumblrPinterestYouTubeFlipboardRSS

Contact Us

Browse by Decades

Popular Posts