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August 2, 2021

20 Amazing Photos of Crystal Gayle Posing With Her Knee-Length Hair

Crystal Gayle (born Brenda Gail Webb; January 9, 1951) is an American country music singer and songwriter. She is best known for her 1977 crossover hit, “Don’t It Make My Brown Eyes Blue.” Initially, Gayle’s management and record label were the same as that of her oldest sister, Loretta Lynn. Not finding success with the arrangement after several years, and with Lynn’s encouragement, Gayle decided to try a different approach. She signed a new record contract and began recording with Nashville producer Allen Reynolds. Gayle’s new sound was sometimes referred to as middle-of-the-road (MOR) or country pop, and was part of a bigger musical trend by many country artists of the 1970s to appeal to a wider audience. Subsequently, Gayle became one of the most successful crossover artists of the 1970s and ’80s. Her floor-length hair has become synonymous with her name.


As a child, Gayle’s mother kept her hair short. She was inspired to grow her hair to her knees after seeing a woman with similar hair in Nashville. When her hair increased in length by the late 1970s, Gayle’s fan club also significantly increased.

By the early 1990s, her hair had reached floor’s length. During that time, she considered significantly cutting her hair due to headaches and time spent maintaining it. However, she ultimately decided not to cut it. Gayle credits her daughter for discouraging a haircut. Gayle’s daughter told her, “You can’t cut your hair — you won’t be Crystal Gayle.”

Gayle also stated that it is easier to have long straight hair, “I know some people think: ‘Why does she keep it so long?’ I’d probably love to try all the different styles, but I’m not a beautician. So, I keep it long. It’s easy to wash and let it go.” However, according to Gayle, she still continues seeing a hairstylist. Within a year, she cuts 9 to 12 inches of hair.
























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