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May 3, 2021

Early Photos by Kodak From the Late 19th Century

Back in the late 19th century, Mr George Eastman, who had established the Eastman Dry Plate Company, was working on an invention that would enable pieces of paper covered in photographic emulsion to record photographic positives. Along with the help of William Walker, another photographic expert, the two developed a holder for Eastman’s photo plates.

In 1888, Eastman trademarked the name “Kodak”, a meaningless word which would soon develop a definition on its own and rapidly become one of the most recognizable brands in the world. To accompany the trademarked name, Eastman developed and released a Kodak camera which was loaded with paper film of 100 photos. And so was born the amateur photograph.

By 1897, Kodak had patented a pocketable camera. By 1900, they had released the ‘Brownie’, a basic cardboard box camera with a simple meniscus lens that took 2 1/4-inch square pictures on 117 roll film – The Brownie functioned so quickly and easily that the word ‘snapshot’ was born.

A set of found photos from Lonedesert that shows early images taken by Kodak from the late 19th century.

Schumacher's Ranch, Tucson, Arizona, March 15th, 1897

1888

1888

1888

1888

1888

1888

Philip Rogers, Oconomowoc Lake, Wisconsin, July 17, 1890

Road Master Tom McCarly, June 1890

September 14, 1890

September 1890

Vermont Ave. & West Ave., circa 1890s

1895

1895

Around 1895

Around 1895

Around 1895

Around 1895

Around 1895

September 12, 1895

Christmas 1896

Bridge at Charleston, West Virginia, 1897




1 comment:

  1. Kodak actually refers to the sound the shutter makes when taking a picture with a 1900 Brownie camera. The Brownie was advertised with the slogan "All you do is press, we do the rest".

    ReplyDelete



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