Bring back some good or bad memories

June 18, 2020

Vibrant Vintage Photos of NYC Gay Pride in the ‘70s

Pride was born with the liberation of Christopher Street after the chaotic Stonewall rebellion on the morning of June 28, 1969, a historic event that was followed by a decade of rebellion, activism, and visibility. An event as a statement of identity and a call to action, from then on it has always wavered between celebration and demonstration. Take a look back at the pride march of New York City’s LGBT community back in the 1970s:

A pair of shirtless men as they walk, arm in arm, during the first Stonewall anniversary march, 1970. (Fred W. McDarrah)

A man holds a 'Gay Pride' sign during the 1st Stonewall anniversary march, 1970. (Fred W. McDarrah)

A woman holds a large sign that reads 'I am a lesbian and I am beautiful' during the 1st Gay Liberation Day march, 1970. (Fred W. McDarrah)

Gay liberation movement in Central Park, 1970. (Leonard Freed)

Following the Christopher Street Liberation Day March, a couple kiss in Central Park, 1970. (Fred W. McDarrah)
An LGBT parade through New York City on Christopher Street Gay Liberation Day reaches a police line, 1971. (Michael Ochs Archives)

Gay and Lesbian activists protest discrimination at the Christopher Street Gay Liberation Day, 1971. (Michael Ochs Archives)

Marchers congregate before Pride, New York, 1971. (Michael Ochs Archives)

A parade-goer, dressed in a flower-print muumuu, as he walks in the 2nd annual Gay Liberation Day march, 1971. (Fred W. McDarrah)

Two women, one in a headband and the other in facepaint, on 7th Avenue South as part of the 2nd annual Gay Liberation Day march, 1971. (Fred W. McDarrah)

Parade-goers during the 2nd annual Gay Liberation Day march, 1971. (Fred W. McDarrah)

People dancing in Central Park following the march, 1971. (Ron Frehm)

Members of the Church of the Beloved Disciple carry banners and signs as they walk in support during the 2nd annual Gay Liberation Day march, 1971. (Fred W. McDarrah)

Representatives of the Buffalo Radical Lesbians take part in the Christopher Street Gay Liberation Day march, 1971. (Michael Ochs Archives)

Members of STAR, the Street Transvestites Action Revolutionaries, pose during the fourth annual Gay Pride Day March, 1973. (Fred W. McDarrah)

Parents march with their children at the 5th Annual Gay Pride Day march, 1974. (Bettmann)

Two parade-goers hold hands and walk along a West 4th Street during the 6th Annual Gay Pride Day march, 1975. (Fred W. McDarrah)

A pair of parade-goers, one shirtless and tattooed, pose together during the 6th Annual Gay Pride Day march, 1975. (Fred W. McDarrah)

Parade-goers, one with a sign that reads 'My Son is Gay and That's OK,' during the 6th Annual Gay Pride Day march, 1975. (Fred W. McDarrah)

The Church of the Beloved Disciple's float in the 6th Annual Gay Pride Day march, 1975. (Fred W. McDarrah)

A couple wearing 'Gay is Proud' t-shirts at a Gay Pride march, 1970s. (Homer Sykes)

A parade-goer at the annual Gay Pride, 1976. (George Dudley)

A woman holding a sign at the 8th Annual Gay Pride, Central Park, 1977. (Leonard Fink)

A parade-goer at the annual Gay Pride, 1978. (George Dudley)

A protester in drag with a banner declaring 'Not Every Boy Dreams Of Being A Marine' during a Gay Pride march up Fifth Avenue to Central Park, 1979. (Brian Alpert)

A marcher in a gay rights parade up New York's Fifth Avenue, 1979. (Brian Alpert)

A group of men dressed in leather cross 32nd Street and Fifth Avenue, 1979. (Hulton Archive)


2 comments:

  1. I'm guessing most of them died from AIDS.

    "For this reason God gave them over to dishonorable passions. Even their women exchanged natural relations for unnatural ones. In the same way the men also abandoned natural relations with women and were inflamed with lust for one another. Men committed shameful acts with other men, and received in themselves the due penalty for their error." (Romans 1:26-27)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Herve Leger, sometimes deliberately written as Herve Leger is a French fashion house founded by the designer Herve Peugnet, also known as Herve L. Leroux Herve Leger Dresses was founded in 1985 by the designer Herve Peugnet (1957–2017). The same year Karl Lagerfeld advised Peugnet that his surname Peugnet would be too difficult for Americans, the target market, to pronounce, and instead suggested the surname Leger. Having lost the rights to the Herve Leger name, Peugnet later took a third "brand" name as Religious Clothing Herve Leger in 2000.A model walking the runway at Herve Leger Bandage Dresses Fall/Winter 2014 show at New York Fashion Week, February 2014.

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