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March 23, 2015

A Goodyear Six-Wheeled Bus From the 1920s

The bus was built under license from Goodyear by The Six-Wheel Co. Earlier Ellis W. Templin developed and filed a patent for the design of the Six-Wheel Truck for the Goodyear Tire Company on June 30, 1921.


Earlier Ellis W. Templin developed and filed a patent for the design of the Six-Wheel Truck for the Goodyear Tire Company on June 30, 1921.

Templin left Goodyear after the truck was developed and for a time went to Wisconsin and worked with others on the design. Later in a three-page article in the July 10, 1924 Automotive Industries covering the new low-slung Six-Wheel Bus, Templin was listed as the Chassis Engineer and Chester M. McCreery the Vice-President for the new Six-Wheel Co. The article also credited both with developing the concept for Goodyear.

The Company was a subsidiary of the The Six-Wheel Company, and both were located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The bus was on a 255-inch w.b. chassis that was the longest made in the US at the time. The new offering not only featured twin rear axles, but also a quickly-detachable Timken front axle and spring assembly. The engine was a rubber and spring-mounted 331 c.i. 70 h.p. Continental Six backed up by a Brown-Lipe gearset.

The Six-Wheel Co. Bus production line in Philadelphia, PA.

The body of the 27-passenger coach was of all steel construction with the exception of the roof, and made of manufactured panels that could be changed quickly after being damaged. This coach and its long wheelbase were intended for interurban service and a 31-inch shorter unit with a taller roofline was available for use in cities.

Very little other information was found covering the attractive, low and unique creation or how the enterprise fared. The top two photos are courtesy of hyperv6 whose great uncle worked for the Company. Look for an article covering the modern Edmond & Jones Model 20 Bullet-Shaped Headlamps that the bus is wearing tomorrow.

1. Continental Six – 2. Heavy bracing – 3. The longest chassis in the U.S.

1. Replaceable panels. 2. Window regulators 3. The finished interior with gray leather seats.

(This original article was published on The Old Motor)




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