Tuesday, May 31, 2011

Vintage houses

Daceyville, garden suburb, from Randwick Road, August 1915

Edgewater flats, Elizabeth Bay, 1937

Brick house, ca. 1940

"Queenslander" house and car, ca. 1930

Pechey family, Craigend, Darlinghurst, ca. 1882-1885

Edmund Webb, his wife and two daughter and their home, Hathrop, Bathurst, ca. 1875

Pearce family, Blenheim House, Randwick, Sydney, N.S.W., ca. 1885

Plague in Sydney 1900

When bubonic plague struck Sydney in 1900, George McCredie was appointed by the Government to take charge of all quarantine activities in the Sydney area, beginning work on March 23, 1900. At the time of his appointment, McCredie was an architect and consulting engineer with offices in the Mutual Life of New York Building in Martin Place. McCredie's appointment was much criticised in Parliament, though it was agreed later that his work was successful.

Kent-street from Views taken during Cleansing Operations, Quarantine Area, Sydney, 1900

Cleansing the streets from Views taken during Cleansing Operations, Quarantine Area, Sydney, 1900

Lane at side of 72 Sussex-street from Views taken during Cleansing Operations, Quarantine Area, Sydney, 1900

Batson's Lane, off Sussex-street from Views taken during Cleansing Operations, Quarantine Area, Sydney, 1900

No. 7 West-street, off Oxford-street (rear) from Views taken during Cleansing Operations, Quarantine Area, Sydney, 1900

Bunny Yeager Beach Babes




Three recently-acquired vintage postcards from Bunny Yeager's 1950s and 60s heyday as a cheesecake photo pinup photographer.

Monday, May 30, 2011

Vintage Hy-Rail in Duluth Depot train museum





Little Lulu Says...

Lookie! Two 1940s Kleenex ads featuring Lulu, who also had a neon billboard in Times Square during this decade.

Cinerama 1940s






Sexy Jane Fonda

Sunday, May 29, 2011

Fab Fifties Facelifts

Hudson 37

Hudson 46-47

Frazer 48

Frazer 51

Nash 52

Celebrities in the Renaissance






Saturday, May 28, 2011

Cute Vintage Album Covers (P.II)






Marilyn Monroe in Korea. 1954

Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio were on their honeymoon in Tokyo, Japan in February of 1954 when Marilyn recieved an invitation from General John E. Hull’s Far East command to entertain the U.S. troops stationed in war torn Korea. After a little thought and discussion with her husband she said yes. It should be said though that Joe objected to her going to Korea at that time as he feared for her safety. The armistice had just been signed in July of 1953 and she was going to do some of her shows very close to the front lines which was still a very dangerous place at that time, but she said it was ”the least she could do.”

Her whirlwind tour consisted of ten shows in four days in sub-zero temperatures. Wearing nothing but a skin tight, low cut, plum colored sequined gown, she wowed the troops with her singing, dancing, and banter. Everywhere she went she was greeted with warmth and appreciation. One Army Corps of Engineers officer said of Marilyn, *“Of all the performers who came to us in Korea-and there were a half a dozen or so-she was the best...

It was bitter cold, but she was in no hurry to leave. Marilyn was a great entertainer. She made thousands of GI’s feel like she really cared.” Marilyn performed with a band made up of eleven servicemen called Anything Goes. Her pianist, Albert Guastafeste was taken aback by how down to earth and modest she was. He was quoted as saying,”Someone ought to go up to her and tell her she is Marilyn Monroe. She doesn’t seem to realize it. When you make a goof she tells you she’s sorry. When she goofs, she apologizes to me!”

During her tour she also visited hospitals in Japan where wounded servicemen lay, stopping to talk, shaking hands, signing autographs, posing with all that asked for pictures. Even though she was totally exhausted from the tour and caught a mild case of pneumonia, she later told her friend Amy Greene that the Korea tour was one of the highlights of her entire career.






Marilyn Monroe meets Queen Elizabeth II, London, 1956