April 10, 2018

“Slip Me Five” – Incredible Slang Words of the 1930s We Need to Bring Back Today

In the 1930s the Great Depression was just getting it’s steam, the epic American historical film Gone with the Wind was in theaters and radio shows were the popular form of entertainment. The slang of the ’30s was all about the blue collar side of life from alcohol to women, gambling and more.


1. Giggle Juice – The 1930s slang term was used to describe alcohol, often found in illegal speakeasies during the prohibition. I.e. “What’s in this giggle juice, it’s great!”

2. Blow Your Wig – Used to say that someone was very excited. I.e. “Don’t blow your wig, Johnny, it’s just a new car.”

3. Butter and Egg Man – This 1930s slang term was used to describe a person who was the money man, someone with a lot of money, etc. I.e. “Timmy’s the new butter and egg man, he’s loaded.”

4. Taking the Rap/Fall – The 1930s slang term was used when someone took the blame for crimes another committed. I.e. “Did you see Davy take the rap for Tony? He’s a real stand up guy.”

5. Ring a Ding Ding – Used as a way to describe or express that someone had a great time at a party. I.e. “This is a great party! Ring a ding ding!”

6. Grifter – The 1930s slang word was used to describe someone who was a con man or woman. I.e. “I think that grifter cheated me out of my money!”

7. Make Tracks – This 1930s slang term was a way to say that a person has/should leave quickly, in a hurry or abruptly. I.e. “I heard your father coming home and I had to make tracks.”

8. Slip Me Five – Used as a way to say that a person wanted to shake hands with another. I.e. “Lou, how’s it going? Slip me five, you old dog!”

9. Greaseball – This slang word was a way to tell or say that someone that they was unpopular, disreputable, unworthy, etc. I.e. “I don’t know how to tell you this, Anna, but your boyfriend is a greaseball.”

10. Clam Bake – The 1930s slang term was used to describe a party, always in conjunction with a fun time. I.e. “My birthday party is going to be a clam bake!”

11. Cat/Alligator – Used as a way to describe a person who was a fan of swing music. I.e. “My friend here is a cool cat, he’s a big fan of Glenn Miller.”

12. Bumping Gums – This 1930s slang term was used to say that someone was talking about nothing important. I.e. “Oh, I don’t have anything special to say, just bumping gums until the mechanic get’s done with my car.”

(via Coolest Words)



0 comments:

Post a Comment


FOLLOW US
FacebookTumblrPinterestInstagramFlipboardRSS

Browse by Decades

Popular Posts