Saturday, January 31, 2015

Story of The Notorious John Dillinger in the 1930s Through Pictures

When notorious outlaw John Dillinger was gunned down on Lincoln Avenue on a steamy July night in 1934, his death ended a months-long manhunt that captivated the press and the public.

John Herbert Dillinger was a Depression-era bank robber from Indiana who's reign of illegal activity lasted only one year. From September 1933 until July 1934, he and his violent gang terrorized the Midwest, killing 10 men, wounding 7 others, robbing banks and police arsenals, and staging 3 jail breaks. In June 1934, Dillinger was named America's first Public Enemy Number One by the FBI. On July 22, 1934, Dillinger was shot and killed by the FBI as he walked out of the Biograph Theater on Chicago's north side. Anna Sage, his friend, had betrayed him to the FBI in return for not getting deported to her home country of Romania. Sage became known as the "Woman in Red" for her choice of clothing that day.

John Dillinger, center, is handcuffed to Deputy Sheriff R. M. Pierce, left, during Dillinger's court hearing in Crown Point, Indiana during the first weeks of February 1934. Dillinger was charged with killing police officer William O'Malley, 43, during a bank robbery in East Chicago, Indiana on Jan. 15, 1934. His trail date was set for March 12, 1934. Dillinger would break out of the Crown Point, Indiana jail on March 3, 1934. — Chicago Tribune historical photo

Sgt. Edward A. Grim of the North Robey Street police station with a Dubuque, Iowa newspaper found in John Dillinger's stolen and abandoned automobile on May 2, 1934. The bloodstained getaway car, found at 3338 N. Leavitt Street in Chicago, had a surgical kit, matches from the Little Bohemia Resort, and the newspaper dated April 23, 1934 with the headline "Dillinger On Rampage." — Chicago Tribune historical photo

Indiana state police surround the house where two of the convicts were supposed to have been from the Michigan City prison break, circa Oct. 1933. On Sept. 26, 1933, ten convicts, lead by John 'Red' Hamilton, broke out of the Indiana State Prison in Michigan City, Indiana, using guns smuggled to them by John Dillinger. In the coming days after the prison break, the Chicago Tribune reported over "500 vigilantes, police and deputy sherriffs" searched the farming districts near Michigan City for the felons. Dillinger, who was in a jail cell in Lima, Ohio, engineered the escape of the ten convicts, who became known as Dillinger's gang. Less than a month after they escaped from Michigan City, several of Dillinger's gang broke him out of the jail in Lima, Ohio. — Chicago Tribune historical photo

John Dillinger, center, is led through the Crown Point, Indiana court building on Jan. 31, 1934 to be viewed by witnesses from the First National Bank robbery that occurred on Jan. 15, 1934 in East Chicago, Indiana. Dillinger had been caught in Arizona and flown back to Indiana to be tried for the murder of patrolman William O'Malley, 43. — Chicago Tribune historical photo

John Dillinger arrived back at the county jail at Crown Point, Indiana on Jan. 30, 1934 after being caught in Arizona five days earlier. Authorities were fearful that Dillinger's gang would try to rescue their leader, so heavily armed guards surrounded the court house and jail. Dillinger was charged with killing police officer William O'Malley, 43, during a bank robbery in East Chicago, Indiana on Jan. 15, 1934. — Chicago Tribune historical photo

White high school students cursing black students in Montgomery, Alabama, 1963

White high school students cursing black students on the first day that public schools were integrated in Montgomery, Alabama, 1963. Photo by Flip Schulke

Gypsy Dancers in Madrid, 1960

A collection of 30 interesting black and white photographs of gypsy dancers in 1960. All photographs were taken by LIFE photographer Loomis Dean in Madrid.






Anti-bra protest, California, c.1969

Friday, January 30, 2015

40 Cool Vintage Photos of Celebrity Weddings

Natalie Talmage and Buster Keaton, 1921 Natalie Talmage and Buster Keaton, 1921. Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images

Wallis Simpson and Edward, Prince of Wales, 1937 Wallis Simpson and Edward, Prince of Wales, 1937. Keystone / Getty Images

Nat King Cole and Maria Hawkins Ellington, 1948 Nat King Cole and Maria Hawkins Ellington, 1948. Hulton Archives / Getty Images

Elizabeth Taylor and Conrad Hilton, 1950 Elizabeth Taylor and Conrad Hilton, 1950. Keystone / Getty Images

Ava Gardner and Frank Sinatra, 1951 Ava Gardner and Frank Sinatra, 1951. Hulton Archive / Getty Images

Wonderful Color Photographs of The Beatles' Rooftop Concert in 1969

30th January 1969, The Beatles surprised a central London business district with an impromptu concert from the roof of Apple offices at Savile Row, London. They played tracks including "Don't Let Me Down", "I've Got a Feeling", "Dig A Pony" and "Get Back". The police arrived to halt the proceedings, but the band continued to play. Despite their protest, no arrests were made, and the performance continued for 42 minutes.

Ringo said "It was a memorable day for me - we were doin' what we did best - making music. But I am still disappointed the policemen didn't drag me off me drums!".

This was their final public performance.






Passengers aboard a Braniff International flight, 1967

Passengers aboard a Braniff International flight, enjoy their personal space while drinking coffee and reading magazines, 1967.