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August 25, 2019

20 Amazing Vintage Photos of Sean Connery When He Was Young

From humble beginnings as a school dropout, Sean Connery (born August 25, 1930, Edinburgh, Scotland) became a major movie star at the age of thirty-two, when he was cast as the sophisticated secret agent James Bond. Connery went on to distinguish himself in a number of major motion pictures, including his Oscar-winning performance in The Untouchables. With more than sixty movies to his credit, Connery has become one of the world's most prominent movie stars.


After a three-year stint in the navy and a series of odd jobs, Connery became a model for student artists and men’s fashion catalogs. He represented Scotland in the 1953 Mr. Universe contest (he finished third in the tall-man’s division), which in turn led to work as an extra in stage productions.

In 1962 Connery was cast in the role of James Bond, Agent 007 of the British Secret Intelligence Service, in the screen adaptation of Ian Fleming’s spy thriller Dr. No. The immense success of the film and its immediate sequels, From Russia with Love (1963) and Goldfinger (1964), established the James Bond films as a worldwide phenomenon and Connery as an international celebrity. Not wanting to be typecast as the superspy, Connery continued to take other acting roles, notably in Alfred Hitchcock’s psychological thriller Marnie (1964). After completing the next two James Bond films, Thunderball (1965) and You Only Live Twice (1967), Connery renounced the role of Bond. Four years later, however, he was persuaded to return to the role for Diamonds Are Forever (1971), which he declared was his last movie as Bond.

He spent the 1970s playing mostly in period dramas and science-fiction films, the best among them being The Molly Maguires (1970), Zardoz (1974), Murder on the Orient Express (1974), The Man Who Would Be King (1975), The Wind and the Lion (1975), Robin and Marian (1976), and The First Great Train Robbery (1979; also released as The Great Train Robbery). In 1981 he made a memorable appearance as King Agamemnon in Terry Gilliam’s time-travel fantasy Time Bandits, and two years later he delighted Bond fans by returning to the role of 007 in the slyly titled Never Say Never Again (1983).

Connery officially retired from acting following his appearance in the film adaptation (2003) of the comic-book series The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, though he went on to perform various voice roles. Connery received a Kennedy Center Honor for lifetime achievement in 1999 and was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 2000. In addition to his film work, Connery was an outspoken advocate of Scottish independence, strongly supporting the Scottish National Party.
























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