Wednesday, November 2, 2016

17 Impressive Vintage Photographs by John Albok Showing Clotheslines in New York City in the 1930s and 1960s

Living in New York City, one becomes accustomed to the grey area between public and private space. Intimate details are exposed through the most mundane daily tasks. Laundry is one of those inevitable rituals that most New Yorkers have to perform in public. Before laundromats, the clothesline was an intrinsic component of the urban landscape. It is impossible to imagine the archetypal tenement building complete without several strands of white linen connecting each structure.

Hungarian-born and New York-raised photographer John Albok spent his career trying to document the hustle and bustle of the big city in a poetic and human way. From images of isolation to lively urban dwellings to the myriad of clotheslines filling the skyline in the Lower East Side of Manhattan from the 1930s, Albok's visions draw up the human complex within the tumultuous era of the Great Depression.

These impressive photographs by John Albok, were selected as a testament to his eye and his search for art in the most common places of the densely populated city of New York.

Throughout most of his life his photographs were taken just outside his tailor shop and home on Madison Avenue bordering Spanish Harlem. In several of these photographs you will see his “backyard”. This of course is an airshaft designed to provide air circulation through each apartment.


















(via PDNB Gallery)

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