Thursday, August 11, 2016

Texas in Early Photography – 32 Rare Photographs Show Everyday Life in The Lone Star State Before 1900

Texas is the second largest state in the United States by both area and population. Due to its size and geologic features such as the Balcones Fault, Texas contains diverse landscapes that resemble both the US southern and southwestern regions. Although Texas is popularly associated with the US southwestern deserts, less than 10 percent of Texas' land area is desert.

The term "six flags over Texas" refers to several nations that have ruled over the territory. Spain was the first European country to claim the area of Texas. France held a short-lived colony. Mexico controlled the territory until 1836 when Texas won its independence, becoming an independent Republic. In 1845, Texas joined the United States as the 28th state. The state's annexation set off a chain of events that caused the Mexican–American War in 1846. A slave state before the American Civil War, Texas declared its secession from the US in early 1861, and officially joined the Confederate States of America on March 2 of the same year. After the Civil War and the restoration of its representation in the federal government, Texas entered a long period of economic stagnation.

One Texan industry that thrived after the Civil War was cattle. Due to its long history as a center of the industry, Texas is associated with the image of the cowboy. The state's economic fortunes changed in the early 20th century, when oil discoveries initiated an economic boom in the state.

Here we collected some of rare photographs that capture everyday life in Texas before 1900.

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