Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Rare Photographs of Jack Nicholson at Home in Los Angeles, 1969

In September 1969, not long after Nicholson had charmed moviegoers and critics alike with his deceptively easygoing performance as a sweet-natured, booze-sodden, small-town lawyer in Dennis Hopper’s Easy Rider, LIFE magazine sent Arthur Schatz to photograph the 32-year-old actor at his new home on Mulholland Drive, overlooking Franklin Canyon in Los Angeles. The photographs from that shoot that were never published in the magazine.


Jack Nicholson at home in Los Angeles, 1969. In an issue of LIFE from March 1970, the magazine noted that Nicholson "is a rock fan who enjoys his music with a headset."

Jack Nicholson at home in Los Angeles, 1969.

Jack Nicholson at home, 1969.

Jack Nicholson plays with his daughter, Jennifer, on the deck of his home overlooking Franklin Canyon, Los Angeles, 1969.

Jack Nicholson and his daughter, Jennifer, on the deck of his home overlooking Franklin Canyon, Los Angeles, 1969.

Jack Nicholson and his daughter, Jennifer, on the deck of his home overlooking Franklin Canyon, Los Angeles, 1969.

Jack Nicholson and director Bob Rafelson chat on the deck of Nicholson's home, Los Angeles, 1969.

Jack Nicholson looks at film negatives at his home, Los Angeles, 1969.

Jack Nicholson clowns around at his home with a picture of his friend, the film director Bob Rafelson, Los Angeles, 1969.

Jack Nicholson at home in 1969, taking his first piano lesson with teacher Josef Pacholczyk, prior to starring as a classical pianist-turned-roughneck in the 1970 classic, Five Easy Pieces.

Jack Nicholson at home in 1969, taking his first piano lesson with teacher Josef Pacholczyk, prior to starring in the 1970 classic, Five Easy Pieces.

Jack Nicholson at home in 1969, taking his first piano lesson with teacher Josef Pacholczyk, prior to starring in the 1970 classic, Five Easy Pieces.

Jack Nicholson in his beloved Volkswagen convertible, Los Angeles, 1969. According to notes by writer Judy Fayard that accompanied Arthur Schatz's film when it was sent to LIFE's offices in New York, Nicholson said that "anyone out here who doesn't drive a Volks is either ostentatious or stupid."

Jack Nicholson — wearing what typewritten notes by writer Judy Fayard called "his standard driving regalia: peaked cap, Grand Prix medallion and yellow shades — in his yellow Volkswagen convertible, Los Angeles, 1969.

Jack Nicholson drives his yellow Volkswagen convertible, Los Angeles, 1969.

(Photos: Arthur Schatz—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

1 comment: