Monday, December 26, 2011

Today's Ku Klux Klan

Ku Klux Klan, often abbreviated KKK and informally known as the Klan, is the name of three distinct past and present far-right organizations in the United States, which have advocated extremist reactionary currents such as white supremacy, white nationalism, and anti-immigration, historically expressed through terrorism. Since the mid-20th century, the KKK has also been anti-communist. The current manifestation is splintered into several chapters and is classified as a hate group.

The first Klan flourished in the South in the 1860s, then died out by the early 1870s. Members adopted white costumes: robes, masks, and conical hats, designed to be outlandish and terrifying, and to hide their identities. The second KKK flourished nationwide in the early and mid 1920s, and adopted the same costumes and code words as the first Klan, while introducing cross burnings. The third KKK emerged after World War II and was associated with opposing the Civil Rights Movement and progress among minorities. The second and third incarnations of the Ku Klux Klan made frequent reference to the USA's "Anglo-Saxon" and "Celtic" blood, harking back to 19th-century nativism and claiming descent from the original 18th-century British colonial revolutionaries. The first and third incarnations of the Klan have well-established records of engaging in terrorism and political violence, though historians debate whether or not the tactic was supported by the second KKK. [Wikipedia]

But what does the KKK look like today? Photographer Anthony Karen has documented the modern-day Klan in their homes, at rallies, and at Klan gatherings, taking us deep inside a world we would otherwise never see — a world most of us might not even want to know about.

Donning Klan Robes

Swastika Sole

The Cross and Flames

Child in Klan Robes

Confronting the Klan

White Power Tattoo

Noose, Chain, Door

Klan Rally and Counter-Demonstrators

Cross Lighting: The Event

Racist Tattoos and the Real World

Klan Wedding

(LIFE)

5 comments:

  1. Truly disturbing. Lest we forget. Thank-you for posting these images/summary.

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  2. Wow hate is strong but love is stronger, revenge is powerful but forgiveness is empowering.

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  3. When were these photos taken?

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  4. Love is hate, hate is love. Just a point of view.

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